Life of Pi – Yann Martel

Life of Pi - Book review

Another of my poolside reads however this one was not intentional (a mix up in books I brought led me to have to rely on the little treasure chest that is created by other holiday goers – the hotel book stand). Although most were love stories or murder stories, this little gem shone out and I snapped it up before anyone else could.

I couldn’t wait to get into this book, the film having wiped the floor at the Oscars; I knew it must be good!

****SPOILERS****

I am so glad I didn’t spend £8 going to see this film at the imax, or any cinema for that matter. I knew the basis of the story – a young lad gets shipwrecked and all he has for company is a Bengal tiger. Post read I realise now that ‘basis’ is an understatement: that is the whole story. Over 100 pages of just being at sea – okay you built a raft; caught a fish and ate it; caught a turtle and ate that; blah blah blah. Unfortunately I can’t suppress the need to skip forward and see how many pages there are to go before the next chapter and so knowing there were 100+ between me and the next section of the book was soul destroying. But I persevered.

And I’m glad I did, because now I know I will never have to watch the film. As the story got going a thought crossed my mind ‘if this ends up as a dream I will be SO pissed off’ – well it wasn’t quite a dream but the ending did make me want to rip the book in half and throw it in the pool in a strop. Let’s just say I’m not a fan of endings like this – especially when the book hasn’t exactly been enticing me the whole way through.

Although I wouldn’t care to see the film, I would be interested to see what they filled the two hour gap with as I’m pretty sure this story would not suffice – but then maybe they just filmed him catching a lot of fish, which would be equally boring to watch.

In a way the story represents that of imagination and the imagination of the young, I could imagine my little cousin coming up with something like this after her summer holidays, and for that it is good. On the whole I was very disappointed with this one..a theme you can probably see running through my holiday book choice.

“To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.” – Life of Pi

One Day – Paperback

Everyone knows that a summer holiday spent sitting by the pool is the perfect excuse for an intense reading session, so on mine this year I decided to catch up on some books I should have read some years ago – this also means I can now see the films! I began with David Nicholls’ One Day.

I was surprised to realise that the book was only published in 2009 as the film came out in 2011 – fairly fast if you ask me! Anyway… the story follows two lead characters on one day (15th July) for twenty years of their lives, showing snap shots of where they are and what they’re doing after leaving university. Although on several occasions I did just want to know what happened after that day e.g. while they were on holiday, I realise that that was not the point of the book.

It is obvious from the get go that at some point these two best friends were going to end up together one way or another which kind of ruined the book for me in a small way; I found myself just waiting for it to happen and not really enjoying the book to the full.

I did not see the twist towards the end coming. I won’t ruin it here as the book’s worth a read, but WOW. I was in shock – sitting pool side with my mouth gaping open was not a good look but it happened so there.

This book is about love, friendship and life, and is definitely worth a read if you’re looking for something easy, fast and non-intense; definitely one for the beach.

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