Mojo

I love theatre. As a former drama student, I live for live theatre, be that plays or musicals. When you realise you haven’t seen any live theatre for 6 months, something must be done about it. When I heard that Rupert Grint (Ron from the Harry Potter series) was going to be making his west end theatre debut, and what’s more be appearing alongside 4 other brilliant British actors from stage TV and film, I knew I wanted to go see it. The play had just been extended and I jumped at the opportunity to get tickets.

Mojo is a play by Jez Butterworth and is set in the 50’s entirely in a sleazy club, around a 24 hour period. When club owner Ezra is murdered, his son Baby (Ben Whishaw) and club workers struggle to remain calm after drink and drug infused partying. The play really highlights the power plays between the group, as they panic between themselves.

As I said above, the cast really are absolutely fantastic in this, and the show is certainly one of the best ensemble cast performances I’ve seen for ages. As well as Grint who gives a brilliant performance as Sweets, a man that tends to follow the crowd and who gets freaked out easily. The comedy flair he showed in the Potter films flourishes in this role and he bounces off Daniel Mays who plays Potts brilliantly. Daniel Mays has a flair about his performance and gets some brilliant gags in the play. Colin Morgan (best known as the title role in Merlin) plays Skinny usually calm but constantly being abused by Baby. At one point Morgan is tied to a record player with his trousers down as Whishaw’s Baby brandishes a sword at him. For me, Whishaw gives a powerhouse performance and steals every scene he’s in. Baby is quite unhinged, and Whishaw is amazing in the role, and what’s more he sings and dances. Rounding off the cast is Brendon Coyle as Mickey, the calmest of the bunch, he self-appoints himself as the leader and remains quite menacing throughout.

The conclusion of the play is a shock but is performed wonderfully; Baby discovers that it was Mickey that helped kill his father and in an argument with Skinny he shoots him. Despite trying to help and calm him down, Skinny dies and the group disperse, Sweets and Potts running into the night; and Mickey breaking down in despair. The final member of the cast is relative newcomer Tom Rhys Harries as Silver Johnny – it’s a shame the character didn’t have a bigger role as even though he is mentioned throughout he’s only in two scenes. Helping to uncover the mystery of Ezra’s death, he and Baby disappear into the night.

The play was absolutely fantastic and a brilliant ensemble cast. The show ends its run this week, but I’m so glad I saw this play – a funny comedy but with a stellar cast that managed to make every moment count.

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